skip to navigation
Write a Review

Contact Us

or Call Us at 1-800-776-2228

Create: Cutting and Serving Board

By: Johnny Brooke

Cutting and Serving Board

Getting Started

A DIY cutting and serving board is perfect to use for those charcuterie or cheese trays at your next party. These boards also make outstanding birthday gifts and presents for holidays.

Here’s how to make it.

You Will Need

Materials Needed

Tools Used

  • CNC
  • Cabinet saw
  • 8-Inch jointer
  • 15-Inch planer
  • Miter saw
  • Bandsaw
  • Parallel clamps
  • 3/4" straight bit
  • Drill
  • Sander

Other Materials

  • Hardwood of your choice
  • Wood glue
  • 1" x 1/8" x 60" copper bar
  • Copper-plated screws
  • Mineral oil
  • Pencil
Show Less

Start Repairing

Step 1

For this serving board, I used walnut for the build, but you could use almost any hardwood. I built two boards, so I made an extra thick blank that I later cut in half on the bandsaw. If you are building just one board, you will need a blank roughly 18” x 10” x 1-1/2”.

For this serving board, I used walnut for the build, but you could use almost any hardwood. I built two boards, so I made an extra thick blank that I later cut in half on the bandsaw. If you are building just one board, you will need a blank roughly 18” x 10” x 1-1/2”.

Step 2

After the glue up, your blank will need to be flattened. To effectively flatten a piece this big, I used a simple planer sled. Attach the blank to a flat piece of MDF (or other sheet good) and make sure to shim any corners that rock. Then run it through your planer, riding on the sled.

After the glue up, your blank will need to be flattened. To effectively flatten a piece this big, I used a simple planer sled. Attach the blank to a flat piece of MDF (or other sheet good) and make sure to shim any corners that rock. Then run it through your planer, riding on the sled.

Step 3

One of the features of this serving board design is the pockets that are routed into the face of the board. These are great for dried fruit, nuts, and other smaller items you'd like to serve on the board.

To do this routing, I used a CNC. If you don't have access to a CNC, you could create a router jig using a scrap piece of plywood and a jigsaw, and then route the pocket using a template bit on your router. If you don't have access to a router, you could use something like a carving gouge to get a similar pocket.

The CNC also cut the board to its final dimension. You could also do this using the miter saw. One of the big design elements on this piece is the notched corner, so don't forget to do that before moving to the next step!

One of the features of this serving board design is the pockets that are routed into the face of the board. These are great for dried fruit, nuts, and other smaller items you'd like to serve on the board.

To do this routing, I used a CNC. If you don't have access to a CNC, you could create a router jig using a scrap piece of plywood and a jigsaw, and then route the pocket using a template bit on your router. If you don't have access to a router, you could use something like a carving gouge to get a similar pocket.

The CNC also cut the board to its final dimension. You could also do this using the miter saw. One of the big design elements on this piece is the notched corner, so don't forget to do that before moving to the next step!

Step 4

One of the most interesting design features of the serving board is the copper banding that wraps around the perimeter of the serving board.

To provide a better connection between the copper and the board, I routed a groove into the edges of the board to accept the copper. I did this with a 3/4" straight bit on my router table. You could also do this with a handheld router and edge guide.

I cut the groove in two passes, and flipped the board around 180 degrees between passes, which gave me a perfectly centered groove. I routed this groove on all four sides of the board.

One of the most interesting design features of the serving board is the copper banding that wraps around the perimeter of the serving board.

To provide a better connection between the copper and the board, I routed a groove into the edges of the board to accept the copper. I did this with a 3/4" straight bit on my router table. You could also do this with a handheld router and edge guide.

I cut the groove in two passes, and flipped the board around 180 degrees between passes, which gave me a perfectly centered groove. I routed this groove on all four sides of the board.

Step 5

Attaching the copper took a lot of trial and error, but I eventually got it figured out. I started on the flat end of the board, attaching the copper with the end toward the center of the board.

To install the screw, I first drilled a small hole slightly smaller than the threads on the screws, through the copper and into the wood. With that hole drilled, I widened the hole in the copper, making a clearance hole. This allows the screw to pass through the copper without the threads coming into contact with the metal. Finally, I countersunk the holes so that the heads of the screws would be flush with the copper.

Attaching the copper took a lot of trial and error, but I eventually got it figured out. I started on the flat end of the board, attaching the copper with the end toward the center of the board.

To install the screw, I first drilled a small hole slightly smaller than the threads on the screws, through the copper and into the wood. With that hole drilled, I widened the hole in the copper, making a clearance hole. This allows the screw to pass through the copper without the threads coming into contact with the metal. Finally, I countersunk the holes so that the heads of the screws would be flush with the copper.

Step 6

To clean up the copper, I used a scotch-brite pad, and this left the copper with a really nice, satin sheen. I was honestly amazed at how well this worked and at just how good the copper looked after this.

To clean up the copper, I used a scotch-brite pad, and this left the copper with a really nice, satin sheen. I was honestly amazed at how well this worked and at just how good the copper looked after this.

Finished Product

Hopefully, you enjoyed this project and might consider making a few for your own home or as a gift for someone else! I am looking forward to serving cheese, dried fruits, and charcuterie to my guests on one of these boards next time I have company.

Project 39 of 64

Arrow Fastener on Pinterest

Follow on Pinterest

How do you Arrow?

#madewitharrow

Sign Up For
Some Awesome

X

Hey there! We’ve updated our Privacy and Cookie Policies at the request of some of our friends in Europe. Click Accept to let us know you’re okay with the updates. Thanks!

View Cookie Policy Accept